Hip Injuries

Resolving Groin Injuries

Groin injuries are a common athletic injury in both contact and non-contact sports. Injuries to the groin can occur from direct trauma in sports such ice hockey, basketball, football, rugby, and in non-contact sports such as gymnastics. These injuries should be taken seriously because, once an athlete injures their groin, they are twice as likely as other players to incur the same injury again.

 

Anatomically your groin is the area where your upper thigh meets your pelvis (lower abdomen), essentially the crease or fold between these two areas. However, Groin injuries involve a much larger area than just this. A groin injury can encompass an area that extends from your lower abdomen, to your pelvis, to your hip and inner thigh, and right down to your knee.

 

Iliotibial Tibial Band Syndrome (ITBS) is a common injury that affects triathletes, runners and cyclists. Using conventional treatments, this condition never completely resolves since these treatments typically do not address all of the key structures involved in the injury.

 

ITBS presents as:

  • A sharp or burning pain on the lateral aspect of the knee.

  • Pain radiating up the side of the hip or thigh.

ITBS is an overuse injury caused by the repetitive action of the iliotibial band as it moves across the lateral femoral epicondyle.

 

The primary functions of the Iliotibial Band are to:

  • Provide static stability to the lateral (outer) aspect of the knee.

  • Control adduction (inward motion) and deceleration of the thigh.

  • During a run, the ITB performs this function about 90 times per minute, or 22,000 times during a four-hour marathon.

 

Sciatica is a nerve compression syndrome that can be extremely painful and difficult to manage for both the patient and practitioner. Sciatic pain often affects the lower back, gluteal region, and various areas of the leg and foot. Often, the symptoms effect only on one side of the body.

 

Sciatica can be caused by a disc herniation, compression of the lumbar nerve roots, spinal stenosis, and/or entrapment of the sciatic nerve along its path from the lumbar spine down the leg.

 

Most cases of sciatica are mechanical in nature (98%) and are not secondary to some other pathological process (Infections, tumors, blood clots).

What Are Typical Sciatica Symptoms?

The sciatic nerve is a very long nerve that extends from the hips down the back of the leg, to the heels. Sciatica symptoms vary depending on just where the sciatic nerve is impinged or restricted. Symptoms include:

  • Pain when you sneeze or cough

  • Pins and needles in your legs

  • Burning or tingling down the leg

  • Pain in the rear of the leg that gets worse when sitting

  • A continuous, constant pain on one side of the buttocks and leg

  • Weakness, numbness or difficulty moving the leg or foot

  • A shooting pain that makes it difficult to stand up

  • Pain that feels like a bad leg cramp, but which can last for weeks

 

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